California Lawmakers Call on CFPB for Stronger Payday Lending Rule

Payday Lenders

Have you heard?  After decades of abusive lending practices by payday, car title, and high-cost installment lenders, a federal agency, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) will be releasing a new rule to better protect borrowers who use these loans.

The Center for Responsible Lending (CRL) and California Reinvestment Coalition (CRC) applauded California members of the U.S. Senate, U.S. House of Representatives, California State Legislature, city and county officials, and California Attorney General Kamala Harris who all sent official statements to the CFPB, calling on the bureau to strengthen an earlier, draft version of the rule.

In their letters, California lawmakers and attorney general highlighted that the proposed rule is a step in the right direction, but  that more needs to be done to ensure borrowers are not trapped in a cycle of debt by these predatory loans.

In California, payday lenders typically charge 366% APR on a $300, two-week loan.

Payday lenders and high cost lenders are also offering loans of $2,500 and above at 100% or higher  APRs. Consumers are especially vulnerable to this abusive practice as California does not have an interest rate cap for loans greater than $2,500.

“As elected representatives, we respectfully urge the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to issue a strong federal payday lending rule that puts an end to the payday, car title, and high-cost installment loan debt trap nationwide” the legislators wrote.

“These high-cost unaffordable loans are detrimental to any community, but have a disproportionate impact on our African American and Latino neighborhoods. In California, payday lenders are twice as likely to be located in communities of color than in white communities, even after accounting for income. The core principle of CFPB’s proposal is the right approach—requiring lenders to ensure that a loan is affordable without having to re-borrow or default on other expenses. However, some of the details must be strengthened in order for this approach to truly work and protect Californians from predatory lenders.”

Payday lenders have invested in efforts to ward off state laws and federal regulations that would protect consumers. Some members of the California State Legislature, including California Assemblyman Ian Calderon (District-57) have pushed to weaken regulations against payday and car title lenders by calling on the CFPB to go light on rules that prevent abusive financial practices.

“This rule will create the first nationwide regulatory floor for the payday lending industry, while maintaining the prerogative of states to further strengthen their consumer protection laws and regulations as they see fit.” the attorney general wrote. “I strongly support the Bureau’s proposal to require a meaningful “ability-to-repay” standard and to curb collection abuses, as well as its proposals for structural protections to help protect consumers from being trapped in long-term, unaffordable debt.”

“Payday and car title lending significantly harm borrowers and their families. They lead to financial consequences, such as bank penalty fees, loss of cars, and bankruptcy. It’s discouraging to see that some members of the state legislature have aligned themselves with payday lenders instead of putting the interests of California families first.” explained Center for Responsible Lending Director of California Policy Graciela Aponte-Diaz. “We commend the members and the attorney general for their leadership and standing up against the payday lending industry.”

“For years, payday lenders have siphoned money out of the pockets of Californians who can least afford it,” said California Reinvestment Coalition Director of Community Engagement Liana Molina. “We applaud our state elected officials for standing up for responsible lending and we join them in urging the CFPB to finalize a rule that will protect borrowers.”

California state legislative members who signed the comment letter were:

Senators Bob Wieckowski, Mark Leno, Senator Fran Pavley, Hannah-Beth Jackson, Mike McGuire, Benjamin Allen, and Carol Liu; and Assembly Members Mark Stone, Patty Lopez, Philip Ting, Susan Talamantes Eggman, and Susan Bonilla.

The following local policymakers also called for a stronger payday lending rule:

Berkeley City Councilmember Jesse Arreguin, Menlo Park Mayor Rich Cline, Oakland Mayor Libby Schaff, San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo, Roseville Mayor Carol Garcia, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, San Mateo County Board of Supervisors President Warren Slocum, and Santa Clara County Supervisor Ken Yeager.

Additionally, U.S. Representative Maxine Waters led a group of more than 100 Congressional members in sending a comment letter to the CFPB Director calling for a stronger payday lending rule.

The California Congressional delegation members who signed the comment were: Peter Aguilar, Karen Bass, Xavier Becerra, Ami Bera, Judy Chu, Mark J. DeSaulnier, Anna G. Eshoo, Sam Farr, John Garamendi, Janice Hahn, Mike Honda, Jared Huffman, Barbara Lee, Ted W. Lieu, Zoe Lofgren, Alan Lowenthal, Lucille Roybal-Allard, Linda T. Sánchez, Jackie Speier, Mark Takano, Juan Vargas, and Maxine Waters.

Both U.S. Senators from California, Senators Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer, have also signed on to a letter urging CFPB for a stronger rule.

CRL and CRC have consistently fought against abusive predatory lending practices across California. Recently, CRL and CRC sent comments to CFPB calling for the Bureau to end the payday lending debt trap and close off paths to evasion for predatory payday lenders. Read CRL’s letter here and CRC’s letter here.

As part of its rulemaking process, CFPB released its proposed rule on June 2, 2016, and has since received public comments from families, communities, and organizations. The final day for public comment was on October 7, 2016. The CFPB is expected to make its final decision on the regulations in 2017.

Los Angeles County Takes Stand Against Predatory Payday, Car Title, Installment Lending Practices, Urges Strong CFPB Rules

Editor’s note: If your organization would like to support strong consumer protections being included in the new CFPB rules for payday, car title, and high-cost installment loans, please contact Liana Molina (liana AT calreinvest.org) at CRC and she can help.  The deadline to give your feedback is approaching fast- it’s October 7, 2016!

On Thursday, September 8th, the Chair of the LA County Board of Supervisors, Hilda L. Solis, hosted a press conference with LA community leaders where she talked about the financial harms caused by predatory payday, car title, and high-cost installment loans.

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(Photo credits: Supervisor Solis' office, LULAC, Samuel Chu, and CRC)

LA County Motion

At the press conference, Supervisor Solis announced an LA County motion in support of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) implementing strong federal rules to better protect consumers from harmful lending practices by payday, car title, and high cost installment lenders. The motion was approved unanimously the following week, making Los Angeles County the largest county in California (and the US) to pass a motion supporting strong rules by the CFPB to better protect consumers from predatory lending.

Supervisor Solis explained: “This motion is an important way for the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors to demonstrate that we believe protecting families and their pocketbooks is good public policy and that we strongly support the CFPB finalizing a rule that will prioritize borrowers over ill-gotten profits.”

Community Leaders

Rabbi Joel Thal Simonds, associate program director at the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism, opened the event. He explained: “The words of Exodus 22:24 remind us that ‘If you lend money to My people, to the poor among you, do not act toward them as a creditor; exact no interest from them.’ We seek a just and caring society in which those in need are not set on downward spiral of debt and hopelessness. That is why we must stop the abusive practice of payday lending which profits off the hardships of those living paycheck to paycheck. ”

Borrowers Discuss Their Experiences

During the press conference, former payday loan consumers also spoke about their experience with the so-called “payday loan debt trap.”  The “debt trap” refers to the fact that most payday loan borrowers are unable to repay their first loan when it comes due two weeks after they got it. So, they are forced to roll over or renew the loan, often multiple times, and they are paying an average APR in California of 366% when borrowing these loans.

Christina Griffin explained:

“When I had a financial emergency, I thought I could use a payday loan once and be done with it. Instead, I couldn’t pay back the loan two weeks later- and also be able to pay my other expenses. So, I had to keep rolling over my payday loan- which meant more and more fees and less money for other things- like groceries. As a former customer who survived the “debt trap,” I’m urging the CFPB to put a stop to this “debt trap” for future borrowers.”

Rosa Barragán shared her story of getting caught in a long term cycle of payday loan debt when she took out a loan following the passing of her husband.  You can read more of her story in La Opinión’s article about the press conference: Exigen mano dura para las compañías de ‘payday loans’.

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Rosa Barragan speaking

Pit of Despair Art Installation

In addition to the press conference, a visually stunning, life-sized 3D art installation, the “Pit of Despair” was unveiled.  It was created by an artist named Melanie Stimmel and the team at We Talk Chalk, and it is a graphic illustration of how payday lending really works. The interactive art display has traveled around the country to visually demonstrate the “debt trap” that the majority of payday loan borrowers find themselves in when they are unable to make a balloon payment to repay their loan two weeks after they receive it. As a result, most borrowers renew their loans repeatedly (incurring more charges each time), which has been labeled the “payday loan debt trap.”

Putting finishing touch on Pit of Despair- thanks Americans for Financial Reform!

Putting finishing touch on Pit of Despair- thanks to Americans for Financial Reform for sharing it!

The Negative Impact of Payday Loan Stores in Los Angeles
Los Angeles County is home to approximately 800 payday loan storefronts, by far the most of any county in California. Because of the structure and terms of payday, car title, and high-cost installment loans, they worsen the financial position of most borrowers. Research has found that lenders are disproportionately located in communities of color, and are a net drag on the overall economy.

Bill Allen, CEO of the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corporation, explained the impact  of payday loan fees recently in an LA Daily News OpEd:

“These “alternatives” drain low-income residents’ scant savings. More than $54 million in check-cashing fees and $88 million in payday loan fees each year are paid by county residents. If those consumers had better financial services options, much of that $142 million could go toward building household savings, thus increasing economic stability for their families and communities.”

Gabriella Landeros from the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor explained: “Working families deserve better than the harmful financial products peddled by these lenders, and we join the LA County Board of Supervisors in urging the CFPB to finalize and enforce a strong rule to protect consumers.”

Liana Molina, director of community engagement at the California Reinvestment Coalition, helped organize the event and coordinated with the StopTheDebtTrap team at Americans for Financial Reform to bring the “Pit of Despair” art installation.  She explained:

“The payday loan industry advertises their loans as quick, one-time “fix” for a financial emergencies. In reality, these loans are designed to do the opposite. The majority of borrowers will end up renewing their loans repeatedly and incurring huge fees every time they do so. The CFPB can stop this “debt trap cycle” by implementing a strong rule that would require lenders to underwrite these loans, to determine that borrowers have the ability to repay without having to re-borrow or default on other expenses.”

CRC extends a big thank you to the organizations that made the event possible:

East LA Community Corporation (ELACC),

LULAC – California,

New Economics for Women (NEW),

Mexican American Opportunity Foundation (MAOF),

Montebello Housing Development Corporation (MHDC),

Consumer Action,

Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO,

Labor Community Services, AFL CIO,

Pacific Asian Consortium in Employment (PACE),

Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council (A3PCON),

Multi-Cultural Real Estate Alliance for Urban Change,

Thai Community Development Center (Thai CDC),

Haven Neighborhood Services,

Korean Churches for Community Development (KCCD),

Koreatown Youth and Community Center (KYCC),

Public Counsel,

Religious Action Center for Reform Judaism, and

VEDC

Additional Background on the Impact of Payday Loans in California 

While fourteen states and the District of Columbia have interest rate caps of about 36% APR or less, California law allows for two-week, $300 payday loans at 459% APR interest.

The California Department of Business Oversight recently released two reports on payday lending, and car title and high cost installment loans.

A few stats are included below:

1) Total Number of payday loans: Approximately 12.3 million payday loans were made in California in 2015 and the aggregate dollar amount of the payday loans was about $4.2 billion.

2) Average number of loans and average APRs: The average number of payday loans per customer was 6.5, paying an average APR of 366% (a 5% increase from 2014).

3) Repeat borrowers and “churning” of loans: Contrary to loans being advertised as a “one time fix for emergencies,” 64% of fees in 2015 ($53.53 million) – came from customers who had seven or more payday loan transactions during the year.

The CFPB’s Impact in California

Have you heard? Yesterday was the 5th anniversary of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.  In that short time, the agency has built a reputation for dramatically increasing transparency into the financial services market, leveling the playing field between consumers and financial corporations, and putting bad actors on notice that they will face consequences.

bday cake

Senator Elizabeth Warren is widely credited with the idea of an agency that would stand up for financial consumers, and the CFPB was included in the Dodd Frank financial reform that was passed in response to the mortgage meltdown.

While advocates had repeatedly warned federal and state regulators and elected officials about the predatory mortgages that were being made, these warnings fell on deaf ears.

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Predatory loan advertising

In the summer of 2013, CRC and our allies urged the US Senate to confirm Richard Cordray as director of the CFPB and we were happy to see that he confirmed on July 16, 2013.

CFPB confirm!

CRC and our allies delivering over 25,000 petitions from Californians, urging the US Senate to confirm Richard Cordray.

Since then, Cordray and his CFPB colleagues have been busy!

In an April snapshot about California and complaints submitted by Californians, the CFPB reported:

1) As of April 1, 2016, Californians had submitted 118,900 of the total 859,900 complaints the CFPB had received at that point, or about 14%.

2) Complaints from Los Angeles and San Francisco accounted for nearly 50% of these complaints.  (CRC won’t claim credit for all of the San Francisco complaints, but we receive a fair amount of phone calls from harmed consumers and we frequently suggest making a complaint to the CFPB if it is accepting complaints for that particular product.  Not only does this hopefully lead to redress for the affected consumer, but it also helps the CFPB to see if there are concerning trends- for example if a lot of consumers are complaining about a particular company or product).

3) Speaking of “lots of complaints about a particular product,” mortgages were #1 most complained about product in the April snapshot, accounting for 32% of complaints.  In fact, complaints from California were more likely to be about mortgages as compared to the number of complaints made about mortgages at the national level (about 26%).

4) Debt collection was also frequently complained about, representing 24% of all California complaints, as compared to 26% nationally.

5) Most complained about companies: The CFPB received the most complaints from California consumers about Bank of America, Wells Fargo and Experian.

We’re including five examples of how the CFPB has stood up for consumers below:

1) Stopping Illegal Harassment of Payday Loan Borrowers: The CFPB has stopped companies from engaging in illegal and predatory behavior- like Ace Cash Express illegally harassing their customers into rolling over their payday loans. In announcing the settlement, Director Cordray explained: “This culture of coercion drained millions of dollars from cash-strapped consumers who had few options to fight back.”   Take a look at this graphic from the CFPB’s settlement with Ace Cash Express.  It’s from their new employee training manual and provides a clear diagram on how Ace tried to keep its borrowers caught in the payday loan debt trap:

ACE Cash Express

2) Targeting Enablers Too: The CFPB doesn’t just target bad actors, it also targets companies that enable bad actors- like this California based lead generator (D and D Marketing, doing business as T3Leads (T3)) that sold consumer loan applications as “leads” to small-dollar lenders. The CFPB explained that “T3 failed to vet or monitor its lead generators and lead purchasers, exposing consumers to the risk of having their information purchased by actors who would use it for illegal purposes. T3 allowed its lead generators to attract consumers with misleading statements and took unreasonable advantage of consumers’ lack of understanding of the material risks, costs, or conditions of the loan products for which they apply. T3’s conduct was unfair and abusive….”

To understand why online lead generators can be so bad for customers, take a look at this NPR Story: I applied for an online payday loan: here’s what happened next.

3) Loan Modification Scam Artists: In some ways, California was ground zero for the mortgage meltdown, especially since many of the most predatory lenders (like Countrywide) were headquartered in Southern California.  Since the mortgage meltdown, more bottom-feeding vultures have emerged, preying on desperate homeowners with promises of costly loan modifications that never materialize.  In July 2014, the CFPB, FTC, and state regulators announced a sweep against these scam artists.  The Bureau filed three lawsuits against these companies and individuals who had collected more than $25 million in illegal fees for services that were never delivered.  California was also “well-represented,” with a number of these scam artists located in our state. The CDPB’s complaint alleged that one of these firms,  Clausen, Cobb, and CCMC “managed, staffed, and supported the deceptive loan modification operations of Stephen Siringoringo’s southern California law firm. The State Bar of California initially referred the misconduct to the CFPB.”

4) Predatory Mortgage Loan Servicing: The CFPB hasn’t only gone after scam artists- it’s also worked to stop companies who are cutting corners and hurting their customers in the process.  One such company is Ocwen, a mortgage loan servicer.  In 2013, the CFPB announced a $2 billion settlement against Ocwen for “systemic misconduct at every stage of the mortgage servicing process.”  The settlement also covered homeowners with loans from Litton (a servicer formerly owned by Goldman Sachs who had also received low marks for the way it treated its customers) and Homeward Residential Holdings LLC (formerly American Home Mortgage Servicing Inc.).

5) Protecting Mortgage Customers: During the “Wild West” days of mortgage lending leading which later caused the mortgage meltdown, lenders routinely rewarded their staff members for putting customers into more expensive mortgages.  Surprisingly, this practice was allegedly still in place at RPM Mortgage, according to a 2015, $19 million settlement with the CFPB.

If you’d like to learn more about the CFPB, check out these resources:

Consumers Count: Five years standing up for you

CRC Hosts CFPB Mission District Tour on Small Business Displacement

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Liana Molina discusses displacement of local small businesses at the corner of 16th and Valencia in the Mission District, San Francisco

Yesterday, CRC hosted a visit and tour by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) in the Mission District in San Francisco.  CFPB Director Richard Cordray and Assistant Director Grady Hedgespeth met with local small business owners and leaders from CRC member organizations including MEDA, Opportunity Fund, and Renaissance Entrepreneurship Center who support small businesses with capital and technical assistance.

Displacement in the Mission

In the past few years, growth in the tech sector has created enormous pressure not just on housing rents in the Bay Area, but on commercial rents as well.

The displacement of neighborhood serving small businesses in the Mission is especially troubling, given the critical role they play in supporting, serving and employing longtime residents of the Mission.  Small business owners have also complained about difficulty they face in obtaining bank loans, and research by CRC confirms that small business lending by the five largest banks has dropped dramatically since the recession.

Under the Dodd-Frank financial reform, the CFPB is charged with collecting data about small business lending.  In February this year, the CFPB announced that writing these rules is considered a near term priority goal. Similar to the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act, these new rules are expected to increase transparency (and accountability) about who is getting small business loans- and who isn’t.

Small business owners share their experiences and challenges

Director Cordray and Assistant Director Hedgespeth met with several of these small business owners during the CFPB’s visit.  The first stop on the tour was Venga Empanadas, where co-owner Pablo Romano shared his experience in obtaining financing to open his restaurant.  Denied financing by a bank, Mr. Romano connected with Opportunity Fund, a Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI) who provided him with a $45,000 loan, enabling him to sustain and grow his business which now has eight employees.

D'Maize

Luisa Estrada, owner of D’Maize Restaurant and Catering speaks with Director Cordray.

Next, Zenaida Merlin and Luis Estrada, owners of D’Maize Restaurant and Catering, shared how a small business loan of $80,000 from Mission Economic Development Agency’s (MEDA) new CDFI Adelante loan fund meant that D’Maize was recently able to expand their business to a full-service restaurant.  They now employ 22 people from the local community.

Elsa Valdez, the owner of El Salvador Restaurant, explained how she benefitted from working with MEDA, who helped her to get a loan from KIVA to help pay for improvements to her restaurant, which has been family owned for over 20 years.  Ms. Valdez wants to continue improvements to the restaurant and growing her business.

Paula

Paula Tejada, owner of Chile Lindo Delicatessen and Coffee Shop

Paula Tejada, known as “The Girl from Empanada” is the owner of Chile Lindo Delicatessen and Coffee Shop, a business she first purchased in 1995.  Working with Renaissance Entrepreneur Center, she received technical assistance on running her business, including their 14 week business planning class focused on marketing, management, operations and finance.

Lunch at San Jalisco

The tour concluded with lunch at San Jalisco, owned by Dolores “Josie” Padilla-Reyes.  She took over the restaurant from her parents in the 1970s, but after rent was increased threefold, she had to close the café and reopen the eatery in its current location.  Concerned about being displaced again, she worked with the Mission Economic Development Agency (MEDA) to secure a loan to purchase her building, preventing further displacement.

Len Rogers, the owner of the Electric Bicycle Superstore, also joined the lunch.  He launched his small business in 2008 and it has grown steadily since then.  Len was denied by multiple banks for credit, making him a perfect target for expensive merchant cash advance companies. After struggling with unsustainable payments required by multiple predatory finance companies, he connected with Opportunity Fund, who refinanced him into an affordable, responsible small business loan.  Len was also a client of Renaissance Entrepreneurship Center, who helped him get a KIVA loan and provided consulting services through their Bayview Office.

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The lunch concluded with a “Happy Birthday” cake presented to the CFPB staff, since yesterday was the Bureau’s fifth birthday. In that short time, the agency has secured over $11 billion in relief for over 27 million consumers and handled nearly 1 million complaints.

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New Report find Predatory Lending is Growing in California

DBO Car Title Report

new report released earlier this month by the California Department of Business Oversight provides new and disturbing data about the growth of predatory lending in California.

Liana Molina, director of community engagement at the California Reinvestment Coalition released the following statement:

“Today’s report proves that while high-cost installment and car title loans are currently legal in our state, they are causing incredible financial harm for California borrowers.

For consumer loans greater than $2,500, there is no interest rate cap, and it’s clear the lenders are taking full advantage.

Sixty-five percent of loans for $2,500-$4,999 came with interest rates of 70% APR or higher (354,696 loans). For loans of $5,000 to $9,999, thirty percent of the loans (51,236) had interest rates of 70% APR or higher.

Also troubling is that the number of car title loans increased almost 10% last year in California. This is especially disturbing since car title lenders also reported to the Department of Business Oversight that they repossessed nearly 17,000 cars from their customers in 2015. Not only are these lenders originating unsustainable, high-cost, predatory loans, but thousands of people (about 15% of their customers) lost their main mode of transportation as a result of obtaining a car title loan. Even worse, of the 16,989 borrowers who had their cars repossessed, 10,357 of them had a deficiency balance, meaning the lender will continue to harass them for more money beyond just taking their car.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) announced new, proposed rules earlier this month that would create national, uniform rules for payday, car title, and installment loans. While the CFPB’s proposed rules are an excellent first step in curbing the many abuses we’ve seen from this industry, there remains several loopholes that we believe the CFPB should eliminate in the final rule.

How can I help stop predatory lending in California?

We are working with our members, allies, and consumers to urge the CFPB to implement a strong, final rule that has NO exceptions for the industry to exploit.

Join CRC by signing our petition and urge the CFPB to prioritize strong consumer safeguards and responsible lending, NOT predatory lenders.

California Car Title Lender Hall of Shame

Editor’s note: The CFPB, a federal agency, has proposed new rules for payday, car title, and high-cost installment lenders.

BUT, they need to hear from consumers- that means you! We have an easy-to-use page where you can weigh in- it only takes a minute and will help bring about important consumer protections with these loans. Please share a line or two in the comments box about why you care about this issue and want to see strong federal reforms.

PS: You do NOT have to be a payday, car title, or installment borrower to sign the petition.

Car Title report

Similar to payday loans, car title loans also generate a LOT of complaints- and create a lot of financial damage for consumers who use them.  In fact, new research from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau finds that 1 in 5 car title loans will ultimately result in the borrower having their car repossessed. As Liana Molina, director of Community Engagement at the California Reinvestment Coalition commented: “At least car thieves don’t take half your income before stealing your car.”

The compilation below is similar to our Payday Lender Hall of Shame. We’ll be adding in stories about predatory car title lending below.

If you haven’t yet, you’ll want to weigh in on the CFPB’s new proposal to more strongly regulate payday, car title, and installment lenders. We have a website where you can do it: CFPB Comments.   We know the industry will be submitting a lot of comments about protecting their profits (at the expense of consumers), so it’s important the CFPB hear from you!

Beware of Payday Loan Wolves My husband and I scrambled to call banks, lawyers, and anyone we thought could help save this family’s house. Unfortunately, we were too late. The home had been foreclosed on and sold, and now she was about to lose her car, which she needed to get to work every day. We decided to go with her to the store to see if we could help, but there was nothing to be done. The lender that offered her help in her time of need set her up to fail.  June 30, 2016.

Borrowing with auto title loan puts vehicle at risk Liana Molina explains that in comparison to shady car title lenders, at least car thieves don’t take half your income before stealing your car. Newsday. Sheryl Nance-Nash.June 11, 2016.

“A few days later, this headline appeared in Utah: Pleasant Grove woman dies in crash while fleeing repo man, police say. The article explains: “Ashleigh Holloway Best, 35, was estimated to be traveling at least 70 mph on a 35 mph road when she smashed into a tree about 12:20 a.m. at 682 N. 100 East. She had to be extricated from the vehicle and was pronounced dead at the scene, said Pleasant Grove Police Lt. Britt Smith.” Why was she travelling this fast? She was being pursued by a repo man, who was trying to repossess her car on behalf of TitleMax, a car title lender.” Daily Kos: Predatory Lending is Literally Killing People (May 26, 2016)

“Like the idea of paying triple-digit interest rates on a loan, forking out more dough in additional fees and watching the repo man tow away your car? Auto title lenders have got just the thing.” CBS MoneyWatch: Another loan to steer clear of (May 18, 2016)

How does the debt trap work?  Watch this PBS NewsHour episode about T.J. McLaughlin, who had to take some time off work after a medical problem.  Short on money for bills, he borrowed $1,200 from a car title lender (North American Title Loans), at 300% interest rate.  But when he lost his job and was unable to make the payments on this loan, they took his car.

Compilation of Payday Loan Legal Settlements

Editor’s note: The CFPB, a federal agency, has proposed new rules for payday, car title, and high-cost installment lenders.

 

BUT, they need to hear from consumers- that means you! We have an easy-to-use page where you can weigh in- it only takes a minute and will help bring about important consumer protections with these loans. Please share a line or two in the comments box about why you care about this issue and want to see strong federal reforms.
PS: You do NOT have to be a payday, car title, or installment borrower to sign the petition.

 

CRC is starting to compile payday loan settlements- if we’ve missed any, please send them to us: SCOFFEY AT CALREINVEST.ORG and we’ll post em here.  And, Advance America has its own post about all their settlements. You can read it here:  ADVANCE AMERICA PAYDAY LENDER SETTLEMENTS

State bars internet lender, wins $11.7M settlement over ‘rent-a-tribe’ loans
CashCall Inc., an internet lender accused of hiding behind an American Indian tribe to break state laws, agreed to pay nearly $12 million to settle charges filed by Minnesota’s attorney general.The company, based in California, was also barred from further business in the state, Attorney General Lori Swanson said Thursday. “The company engaged in an elaborate scheme to collect payments far higher than allowed by state law,” Swanson said in announcing the settlement. CashCall must cancel all outstanding loans, pay back consumers and “undo any adverse reporting to the credit bureaus.” August 18, 2016.

Arkansas AG Settles Payday Lending Lawsuit for $750,000  One of the defendants, a South Dakota based company, identified itself as a tribal entity with sovereign immunity. The company, however, was neither owned nor operated by a tribe. The complaint alleged that the South Dakota lender entered an agreement with a California-based company, pursuant to which it would originate payday loans before assigning them to the California company to collect. July 9, 2016.

Courthouse News Service:  $1.6 Million Settlement With Payday Lenders: Nebraska will accept $1.6 million to settle a predatory lending suit against CashCall and Western Sky Financial, which it accused of falsely claiming tribal affiliation to duck lending laws. (May 6, 2016).

Times Free  Press: Chattanooga payday king justified illegal business by giving money to charity  (May 18, 2016)  A used car salesman turned tech entrepreneur who operated an illegal payday lending syndicate from Chattanooga will pay $9 million in fines and restitution, as well as serve 250 hours of community service and three years of probation, after pleading guilty to felony usury in New York. Carey Vaughn Brown, 57, admitted to New York prosecutors that he broke the law from 2001 to 2013 by lending millions of dollars — $50 million to New Yorkers in 2012 alone — with interest rates well in excess of the state’s 25 percent annual percentage rate cap.

New York Touts $3M Payday Loan Settlement:  (May 18, 2016). In its first such action, New York’s top financial watchdog reached a $3 million settlement Wednesday with two debt-buying companies that improperly bought and collected on illegal payday loans.

Vermont AG Enters Largest Settlement With Online Payday Loan Processor  (May 24, 2016)  In the settlement agreement, the company admitted that it processed electronic financial transactions on behalf of approximately 43 separate lenders, in connection with high-interest, small-dollar consumer loans made over the internet. None of those lenders were licensed to make loans in Vermont. Between 2012-2014, however, the company processed approximately $1.7 million in transfers from Vermont residents’ bank accounts.

Payday lender will pay $10 million to settle consumer bureau’s claims  (July 10, 2014) “Ace used false threats, intimidation and harassing calls to bully payday borrowers into a cycle of debt,” bureau Director Richard Cordray said. “This culture of coercion drained millions of dollars from cash-strapped consumers who had few options to fight back.”