New Payday Loan Facts in California

Did you hear that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is finalizing rules for high-cost payday, car title, and installment loans?

If you’re curious to know more about these loans, and the impact they have (mostly negative) on Californians and our state economy, then you’ll want to read CRC’s new fact sheet on payday lending in California.

It includes the latest data from the California Department of Business Oversight, as well as research on the negative drag to California’s economy created by payday loans.

california-payday-loan-brochure

 

 

You can download the fact sheet by clicking here.

If you want to learn more about payday loans in California- and the work the California Reinvestment Coalition is doing to take on predatory lending, click here and visit the CRC website.

Los Angeles County Takes Stand Against Predatory Payday, Car Title, Installment Lending Practices, Urges Strong CFPB Rules

Editor’s note: If your organization would like to support strong consumer protections being included in the new CFPB rules for payday, car title, and high-cost installment loans, please contact Liana Molina (liana AT calreinvest.org) at CRC and she can help.  The deadline to give your feedback is approaching fast- it’s October 7, 2016!

On Thursday, September 8th, the Chair of the LA County Board of Supervisors, Hilda L. Solis, hosted a press conference with LA community leaders where she talked about the financial harms caused by predatory payday, car title, and high-cost installment loans.

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(Photo credits: Supervisor Solis' office, LULAC, Samuel Chu, and CRC)

LA County Motion

At the press conference, Supervisor Solis announced an LA County motion in support of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) implementing strong federal rules to better protect consumers from harmful lending practices by payday, car title, and high cost installment lenders. The motion was approved unanimously the following week, making Los Angeles County the largest county in California (and the US) to pass a motion supporting strong rules by the CFPB to better protect consumers from predatory lending.

Supervisor Solis explained: “This motion is an important way for the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors to demonstrate that we believe protecting families and their pocketbooks is good public policy and that we strongly support the CFPB finalizing a rule that will prioritize borrowers over ill-gotten profits.”

Community Leaders

Rabbi Joel Thal Simonds, associate program director at the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism, opened the event. He explained: “The words of Exodus 22:24 remind us that ‘If you lend money to My people, to the poor among you, do not act toward them as a creditor; exact no interest from them.’ We seek a just and caring society in which those in need are not set on downward spiral of debt and hopelessness. That is why we must stop the abusive practice of payday lending which profits off the hardships of those living paycheck to paycheck. ”

Borrowers Discuss Their Experiences

During the press conference, former payday loan consumers also spoke about their experience with the so-called “payday loan debt trap.”  The “debt trap” refers to the fact that most payday loan borrowers are unable to repay their first loan when it comes due two weeks after they got it. So, they are forced to roll over or renew the loan, often multiple times, and they are paying an average APR in California of 366% when borrowing these loans.

Christina Griffin explained:

“When I had a financial emergency, I thought I could use a payday loan once and be done with it. Instead, I couldn’t pay back the loan two weeks later- and also be able to pay my other expenses. So, I had to keep rolling over my payday loan- which meant more and more fees and less money for other things- like groceries. As a former customer who survived the “debt trap,” I’m urging the CFPB to put a stop to this “debt trap” for future borrowers.”

Rosa Barragán shared her story of getting caught in a long term cycle of payday loan debt when she took out a loan following the passing of her husband.  You can read more of her story in La Opinión’s article about the press conference: Exigen mano dura para las compañías de ‘payday loans’.

rosa-barragan-photo-credit-chair-solis-office

Rosa Barragan speaking

Pit of Despair Art Installation

In addition to the press conference, a visually stunning, life-sized 3D art installation, the “Pit of Despair” was unveiled.  It was created by an artist named Melanie Stimmel and the team at We Talk Chalk, and it is a graphic illustration of how payday lending really works. The interactive art display has traveled around the country to visually demonstrate the “debt trap” that the majority of payday loan borrowers find themselves in when they are unable to make a balloon payment to repay their loan two weeks after they receive it. As a result, most borrowers renew their loans repeatedly (incurring more charges each time), which has been labeled the “payday loan debt trap.”

Putting finishing touch on Pit of Despair- thanks Americans for Financial Reform!

Putting finishing touch on Pit of Despair- thanks to Americans for Financial Reform for sharing it!

The Negative Impact of Payday Loan Stores in Los Angeles
Los Angeles County is home to approximately 800 payday loan storefronts, by far the most of any county in California. Because of the structure and terms of payday, car title, and high-cost installment loans, they worsen the financial position of most borrowers. Research has found that lenders are disproportionately located in communities of color, and are a net drag on the overall economy.

Bill Allen, CEO of the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corporation, explained the impact  of payday loan fees recently in an LA Daily News OpEd:

“These “alternatives” drain low-income residents’ scant savings. More than $54 million in check-cashing fees and $88 million in payday loan fees each year are paid by county residents. If those consumers had better financial services options, much of that $142 million could go toward building household savings, thus increasing economic stability for their families and communities.”

Gabriella Landeros from the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor explained: “Working families deserve better than the harmful financial products peddled by these lenders, and we join the LA County Board of Supervisors in urging the CFPB to finalize and enforce a strong rule to protect consumers.”

Liana Molina, director of community engagement at the California Reinvestment Coalition, helped organize the event and coordinated with the StopTheDebtTrap team at Americans for Financial Reform to bring the “Pit of Despair” art installation.  She explained:

“The payday loan industry advertises their loans as quick, one-time “fix” for a financial emergencies. In reality, these loans are designed to do the opposite. The majority of borrowers will end up renewing their loans repeatedly and incurring huge fees every time they do so. The CFPB can stop this “debt trap cycle” by implementing a strong rule that would require lenders to underwrite these loans, to determine that borrowers have the ability to repay without having to re-borrow or default on other expenses.”

CRC extends a big thank you to the organizations that made the event possible:

East LA Community Corporation (ELACC),

LULAC – California,

New Economics for Women (NEW),

Mexican American Opportunity Foundation (MAOF),

Montebello Housing Development Corporation (MHDC),

Consumer Action,

Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO,

Labor Community Services, AFL CIO,

Pacific Asian Consortium in Employment (PACE),

Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council (A3PCON),

Multi-Cultural Real Estate Alliance for Urban Change,

Thai Community Development Center (Thai CDC),

Haven Neighborhood Services,

Korean Churches for Community Development (KCCD),

Koreatown Youth and Community Center (KYCC),

Public Counsel,

Religious Action Center for Reform Judaism, and

VEDC

Additional Background on the Impact of Payday Loans in California 

While fourteen states and the District of Columbia have interest rate caps of about 36% APR or less, California law allows for two-week, $300 payday loans at 459% APR interest.

The California Department of Business Oversight recently released two reports on payday lending, and car title and high cost installment loans.

A few stats are included below:

1) Total Number of payday loans: Approximately 12.3 million payday loans were made in California in 2015 and the aggregate dollar amount of the payday loans was about $4.2 billion.

2) Average number of loans and average APRs: The average number of payday loans per customer was 6.5, paying an average APR of 366% (a 5% increase from 2014).

3) Repeat borrowers and “churning” of loans: Contrary to loans being advertised as a “one time fix for emergencies,” 64% of fees in 2015 ($53.53 million) – came from customers who had seven or more payday loan transactions during the year.

Compilation of Payday Loan Legal Settlements

Editor’s note: The CFPB, a federal agency, has proposed new rules for payday, car title, and high-cost installment lenders.

 

BUT, they need to hear from consumers- that means you! We have an easy-to-use page where you can weigh in- it only takes a minute and will help bring about important consumer protections with these loans. Please share a line or two in the comments box about why you care about this issue and want to see strong federal reforms.
PS: You do NOT have to be a payday, car title, or installment borrower to sign the petition.

 

CRC is starting to compile payday loan settlements- if we’ve missed any, please send them to us: SCOFFEY AT CALREINVEST.ORG and we’ll post em here.  And, Advance America has its own post about all their settlements. You can read it here:  ADVANCE AMERICA PAYDAY LENDER SETTLEMENTS

State bars internet lender, wins $11.7M settlement over ‘rent-a-tribe’ loans
CashCall Inc., an internet lender accused of hiding behind an American Indian tribe to break state laws, agreed to pay nearly $12 million to settle charges filed by Minnesota’s attorney general.The company, based in California, was also barred from further business in the state, Attorney General Lori Swanson said Thursday. “The company engaged in an elaborate scheme to collect payments far higher than allowed by state law,” Swanson said in announcing the settlement. CashCall must cancel all outstanding loans, pay back consumers and “undo any adverse reporting to the credit bureaus.” August 18, 2016.

Arkansas AG Settles Payday Lending Lawsuit for $750,000  One of the defendants, a South Dakota based company, identified itself as a tribal entity with sovereign immunity. The company, however, was neither owned nor operated by a tribe. The complaint alleged that the South Dakota lender entered an agreement with a California-based company, pursuant to which it would originate payday loans before assigning them to the California company to collect. July 9, 2016.

Courthouse News Service:  $1.6 Million Settlement With Payday Lenders: Nebraska will accept $1.6 million to settle a predatory lending suit against CashCall and Western Sky Financial, which it accused of falsely claiming tribal affiliation to duck lending laws. (May 6, 2016).

Times Free  Press: Chattanooga payday king justified illegal business by giving money to charity  (May 18, 2016)  A used car salesman turned tech entrepreneur who operated an illegal payday lending syndicate from Chattanooga will pay $9 million in fines and restitution, as well as serve 250 hours of community service and three years of probation, after pleading guilty to felony usury in New York. Carey Vaughn Brown, 57, admitted to New York prosecutors that he broke the law from 2001 to 2013 by lending millions of dollars — $50 million to New Yorkers in 2012 alone — with interest rates well in excess of the state’s 25 percent annual percentage rate cap.

New York Touts $3M Payday Loan Settlement:  (May 18, 2016). In its first such action, New York’s top financial watchdog reached a $3 million settlement Wednesday with two debt-buying companies that improperly bought and collected on illegal payday loans.

Vermont AG Enters Largest Settlement With Online Payday Loan Processor  (May 24, 2016)  In the settlement agreement, the company admitted that it processed electronic financial transactions on behalf of approximately 43 separate lenders, in connection with high-interest, small-dollar consumer loans made over the internet. None of those lenders were licensed to make loans in Vermont. Between 2012-2014, however, the company processed approximately $1.7 million in transfers from Vermont residents’ bank accounts.

Payday lender will pay $10 million to settle consumer bureau’s claims  (July 10, 2014) “Ace used false threats, intimidation and harassing calls to bully payday borrowers into a cycle of debt,” bureau Director Richard Cordray said. “This culture of coercion drained millions of dollars from cash-strapped consumers who had few options to fight back.”

Testimony from California Reinvestment Coalition on Consumer Loans

Editor’s note: The CFPB, a federal agency, has proposed new rules for payday, car title, and high-cost installment lenders.

BUT, they need to hear from consumers- that means you! We have an easy-to-use page where you can weigh in- it only takes a minute and will help bring about important consumer protections with these loans. Please share a line or two in the comments box about why you care about this issue and want to see strong federal reforms.

PS: You do NOT have to be a payday, car title, or installment borrower to sign the petition.

 

On January 11th, the California Assembly Committee on Banking and Finance held a hearing, “Small Dollar Consumer Lending in California.”

Paulina Gonzalez’ testimony is featured in its entirety below.  After reading her testimony, you may also be interested in seeing CRC’s other resources on payday lending, linked below.  Want to join the conversation and share your experience? Visit #StopTheDebtTrap on Twitter and join the conversation!

Paulina Gonzalez Testimony on Small Dollar Consumer Lending

I am the Executive Director of the California Reinvestment Coalition.  We are a statewide financial and economic just coalition with over 300 organizational members across the state.  I know firsthand the needs of our communities, not only from the work that I do and the communities that CRC represents, but I know this because this is the community that I come from.  I grew up in working class south Montebello, in an immigrant family where we struggled to make ends meet.  But luckily for us, we never had the option of taking out a payday or installment loan that would have left us in a worse situation.

CRC’s members work on the front lines of California’s low income communities and communities of color.  Our members are affordable housing developers, CDFI small business lenders, asset building organizations, and tenant rights organizations.

Our membership serves the constituencies that are the target of the aggressive marketing and outreach efforts of high cost lenders, and they are located in low income communities where payday loans and installment loan store fronts are heavily concentrated.  They serve the constituency that therefore often fall prey to these high cost products.

The lobbyists and corporate executives of the predatory lending industry say that they know our community needs and that they our providing a service with their products by helping families during an emergency when they can’t pay their rent or when their car breaks down.  They say that they provide a last ditch option when our communities have no other option.

But really the so called service they are offering is analogous to offering a starving man poisoned food.

These products leave families in a worse situation than when they started; they leave families thousands, if not tens of thousands of dollars in debt paying 100-500% above the principle over the term of a loan.

CRC agrees with the general goal and principal of expanding access to credit for our communities, particularly for under-served populations, however we want to ensure that the credit that is being offered is fair, affordable, responsible credit, not high-cost predatory loans that trap borrowers in a cycle of debt.

We do not believe that high cost credit, in other words, that poisoned food, is the solution for our communities.

We are concerned about the weak legislative and regulatory framework governing payday lending below $300 and car title and installment lending over $2,500.  The failure to regulate this lending space at each end of the lending spectrum allows for lenders to conduct high cost predatory lending with impunity in this space.

At one end of the spectrum, in the under $300 range you have unregulated interest rates and APRs as high as 450% on these loans.  In addition, you have a business model that relies on repeat borrowing.  The CFPB just last year took an enforcement action against ACE Cash Express, one of the largest payday lenders in the country. They found that ACE used illegal debt collection tactics – false threats of lawsuits or criminal prosecution – to pressure overdue borrowers into taking out additional loans they could not afford.  This is the profit making model these lenders rely on, as evidenced by their employee training manual.

On the other end of the spectrum, in the above $2,500 range, the business model is based on triple digit interest rates that force consumers into loans that can take a decade to pay off and can cost tens of thousands of dollars above the original loan cost.

Imagine paying $30,000 on a $5,000 loan.  Does that sound like a service to you? Or does that sound like poisoned food?

Consumers in the middle lending space, that encompasses the pilot program, have the most protections.  There is a usury cap, some underwriting, and there is reporting to credit agencies.

What we should be discussing is strengthening the middle lending space, extending the protections of the pilot to more people by regulating the $300 payday lending space and the above $2,500 lending space.

Our  current concern with each end of the lending spectrum is that lenders are offering these products without assessing the consumer’s ability to repay, thereby forcing consumers to choose between re-borrowing, defaulting, or falling behind on other obligations, we are also concerned about certain payment collection practices that can subject consumers to substantial fees and increase risk of bank account closure.

Consumers need better protections for consumer loans, across the board, from payday to car title to installment loans, such as:

  • underwriting requirements that take into account income and expenses to ensure borrowers have the ability to repay the loan
  • interest rate restrictions and fee caps of 36% APR or less
  • protections against expensive, long-term debt such as limits on re-borrowing and refinancing

We’re encouraged by the forthcoming CFPB rule and we are working hard to win strong reforms and establish a national floor for consumer protections, we believe it’s premature to change the CFLL, given the impending changes in federal regulatory requirements.

If the legislature is going to proceed anyway, the focus should be on regulating each end of the lending spectrum and leveling the lending playing field to protect consumers from high cost predatory loans and therefore expanding access to responsible affordable credit.

CRC resources on predatory payday, car title, and installment lending

Share Your Story about payday, high cost installment, or car title lending- It only takes 3-5 minutes. By sharing your experience, you can help take a stand against predatory lending and help the CFPB understand why consumers need strong rules to limit predatory loans.

Newspapers around the country are weighing in!  Check out this extensive compilation of 109 editorials (and counting!) against the debt traps created by payday and other high cost loans: Editorials Against Payday Lending

Payday Lender Hall of Shame: If you thought payday lenders are here to help, read this shocking expose of their worst practices.  Some truly shocking behavior!

North American Title Loans Repossess Car from Injured Consumer.  Watch this PBS NewsHour segment about TJ McLaughlin, whose car was repossessed after he couldn’t make payments because of a health problem.

 

North American Title Loans Repossesses Car from Injured Customer

Editor’s note: The CFPB, a federal agency, has proposed new rules for payday, car title, and high-cost installment lenders.

 

BUT, they need to hear from consumers- that means you! We have an easy-to-use page where you can weigh in- it only takes a minute and will help bring about important consumer protections with these loans. Please share a line or two in the comments box about why you care about this issue and want to see strong federal reforms.

PS: You do NOT have to be a payday, car title, or installment borrower to sign the petition.

 

How does the debt trap work?

Watch this PBS NewsHour episode about T.J. McLaughlin, who had to take some time off work after a medical problem.  Short on money for bills, he borrowed $1,200 from a car title lender (North American Title Loans), at 300% interest rate.  But when he lost his job and was unable to make the payments on this loan, they took his car.

If you’re in California and have had a similar experience with car title, payday lender, or high-cost installment loans, please share it with CRC (Click on this link to share your story- it only takes 3 minutes).

The CFPB (Consumer Financial Protection Bureau) is writing rules about high-cost payday, car title, and installment loans. By sharing your experience, you can help the CFPB understand how to make these products safer.  Ultimately, that can mean fewer people going through financial heartaches like the one TJ McLaughlin experienced.

Here’s 7 Reasons Payday Lenders Are Worried About Their Profits

Editor’s note: The CFPB, a federal agency, has proposed new rules for payday, car title, and high-cost installment lenders.

BUT, they need to hear from consumers- that means you! We have an easy-to-use page where you can weigh in- it only takes a minute and will help bring about important consumer protections with these loans. Please share a line or two in the comments box about why you care about this issue and want to see strong federal reforms.

PS: You do NOT have to be a payday, car title, or installment borrower to sign the petition.

Payday Pay to Play

1. They’re spending a LOT of money on politicians BUT money can’t always buy you love

The payday lending industry has always “invested” gobs of money in politicians and elected officials as a way to fight off state-level regulation.  According to a new report from Americans for Financial Reform, the industry must be really worried. They spent over $15 million in campaign contributions during the 2013-14 campaign cycle. Some notable recipients include Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz from Florida who received $31,250.  Wasserman Schultz later signed onto a letter with her Florida colleagues, suggesting that the CFPB shouldn’t make payday lending rules too restrictive.  In response, more than 20 Florida organizations that actually work with people who use payday loans (and see the damage caused by them), wrote a letter to the Florida delegation, reminding them that contrary to the marketing of these loans, the reality is that 63% of payday loan customers in Florida take out 12 or more loans each year.

 2. Regulators are clamping down on their illegal practices:

“A huge payday lending operation based in Kansas City will be banned from offering any more loans under a $54 million settlement announced by federal regulators Tuesday.”  Firms accused of faking loans, draining bank accounts settle with feds

“The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) is suing the NDG Enterprise, a complex web of commonly controlled companies, for allegedly collecting money consumers did not owe. According to the agency’s complaint, the defendants illegally collected loan amounts and fees that were void or that consumers had no obligations to repay, and falsely threatened consumers with lawsuits and imprisonment.”  Offshore payday lender hit with CFPB lawsuit

And, World Acceptance, one of the shadiest lenders out there, also recently shared that the CFPB is investigating it: This Payday Lender Is Being Investigated by the CFPB, and the Stock Got Crushed

3. People don’t like payday loans, in fact, 75% of people want stronger regulation of them.

The more that people learn about payday loans, the more they support regulation of them.  For example, a recent survey by the Pew Charitable Trusts finds that 75% of respondents believe there should be more regulation of payday loans.  This is an increase from 72% of respondents surveyed in 2013.
Did we mention that there have been 95 newspaper editorials written AGAINST payday lending in the past year and a half?

 

4. The gloves are off in exposing payday loan financiers

 The HuffingtonPost broke the story that a new project run by Allied Progress will expose secrets of the payday lending industry- and who profits from it:

“We’re going to do the hard work to expose who these people are and their links to some big corporations and individuals who would prefer to stay in the shadows,” said Frisch. “We’re looking at all types of predatory lending, payday loans, car titles, check cashing, bank fees. Nothing is off the table, both nationwide and in the states, if we see that we can make an impact.”

Read more here: New Project Seeks To Unmask Shadowy Payday Lenders

Another excellent resource for unmasking the folks that profit off of the payday loan debt trap and other shady companies is a website created by Unite Here, called “Loan Shark Funds”, nicknamed after the “Lone Star Fund” that is investing in payday lenders like DFC Global, which it purchased in December 2014.

Take a look: LOAN SHARK FUNDS website:

Lone Shark Funds

5. Companies are heading for the exit doors

Some companies like EZ Corp are seeing the writing on the wall.  The more people learn about payday, car title, and high cost installment loans, the less they like them.  The company announced in July 2015 that it is no longer going to originate payday, car title, or high cost installment loans.

6. Payday Money = Dirty Money  (can somebody please tell the politicians?)

Money made off of putting people in a payday loan debt trap is dirty money.  Take a look at this private school that announced it was returning donations from a payday loan company that is part of a settlement with federal authorities.

7. Banks don’t want to aid and abet this predatory profit model anymore

In this case, it’s a bank in Australia: “Westpac pulls out of funding payday lenders

According to a recent report from our allies Reinvestment Partners, (Connecting the Dots: How Wall Street Brings Fringe Lending to Main Street) there’s still some banks in the US that are willing to fund payday lenders.

Some of the largest banks include:

Wells Fargo ($WFC)

Bank of America ($BAC)

US Bank ($USB)

Capital One ($COF)

Read the report to see more excellent graphs and information like this one:

Wells Fargo Funding High Cost Consumer Loans

 

Did you like this post?   Check out a few of our other most popular payday lending posts:

95 Editorial Against Payday Lenders

CFPB Field Hearing in Richmond, Virginia Summary

The Payday Lender Hall of Shame

 

How Californians Are Working to #StopTheDebtTrap created by Payday and other High Cost Loans

Editor’s note: The CFPB, a federal agency, has proposed new rules for payday, car title, and high-cost installment lenders.

 

BUT, they need to hear from consumers- that means you! We have an easy-to-use page where you can weigh in- it only takes a minute and will help bring about important consumer protections with these loans. Please share a line or two in the comments box about why you care about this issue and want to see strong federal reforms.

PS: You do NOT have to be a payday, car title, or installment borrower to sign the petition.

 

Earlier this year, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau announced  new federal rules under consideration for payday, car title and other high cost consumer installment loans.

Paulina Gonzalez, Executive Director of the California Reinvestment Coalition attended the CFPB’s field hearing in Richmond, Virginia, where the draft proposal was unveiled. Gonzalez testified on the consumer panel about the need for federal reforms.

Back in California, CRC members and our allies have been busy organizing to support rules with strong consumer protections that must require lenders to assess borrowers’ “ability to repay” before extending them a loan. If you are an organization that’s interested in getting involved, please contact CRC’s payday organizer, Liana Molina: liana@calreinvest.org.

If you’re a consumer, please consider sharing your story with payday loans in our short survey.  Sharing your story can be an important way to help clean up this industry!

Some pictures from our work during the past few months are included below.

In October, community advocates sponsored and organized a Southern California Payday Reform Strategy Convening in Los Angeles to discuss the current state of payday lending, the proposed CFPB rules, and the impasse for consumer protection legislation in Sacramento. The picture below is Representative Maxine Waters, Ranking Member of the House Financial Services Committee along with Hernan Vera, who was president of Public Counsel at the time of the convening.

Payday Loan convening

In December, the Coalition Against Payday Predators, a coalition CRC belongs to, held a rally at a payday loan store in San Jose.  Representative Zoe Lofgren spoke at the rally, as did Dr. Emmett Carson, the founding CEO of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation.

 

Rep. Zoe Lofgren speakout against payday loans

In April, CRC partnered with CRL-California and California LULAC to organize the first ever California Consumer Leadership Academy.  Eight courageous women participated in this day-long training, shared their experiences, and crafted strategies on how to stop predatory lending practices in our communities.

California Consumer Leadership Academy

LA and Bay Area Trainings on CFPB proposed rules and filing complaints. In April and May, CRC organized two trainings, titled: “”Winning and Defending Strong CFPB Rules to End High-Cost Debt Traps” where we worked with local service providers to explain the CFPB proposal, the importance of it, and how to file CFPB complaints with or on behalf of the consumers they work with.

April Training in San Francisco at Mission Economic Development Agency

Stop The Debt Trap

May Training at the Community Center at Sol Y Luna Apartments, in partnership with the Center for Asset Building Opportunities and the East LA Community Corporation

Stop the Debt Trap LA

The picture below is of CRC, CRL-California and National Council of La Raza staff  at the NCLR Latino Policy Summit, where we presented on the status of payday lending in California and the current CFPB rule making process. CRC also presented at the Housing Rights Center Summit in Los Angeles and Housing California’s conference in Sacramento.

Stop the Debt Trap NCLR

Finally, CRC has been leading the charge in organizing our members and partners in outreach, education and advocacy work with members of Congress representing various congressional districts across the state. The CFPB will need strong political support to propose, enact and defend strong consumer protections.